Now’s no time to back off training that helps address racism

Physicians, nurses and hospital leaders are urging the Trump administration to rescind an executive order prohibiting federal agencies from conducting and funding trainings that promote racial reconciliation. In a letter to President Trump, the AMA, American Nurses Association (ANA) and American Hospital Association (AHA) said the executive order is “counterproductive to addressing racism” and would “stifle attempts at open, honest discussion of these issues in the public and private sectors.”

My latest for the AMA. The whole shebang.

Physicians decry apparel maker’s anti-female DO misfire

The AMA and others are decrying the sexist and anti-osteopathic physician implications of a medical apparel supplier’s internet catalog listing.

The Los Angeles-based company Figs sells upscale scrubs, medical uniforms and other apparel for physicians and other health professionals. A catalog listing first highlighted by New York physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist Tayyaba Ahmed, DO, showed a woman in pink scrubs holding a copy of Medical Terminology for Dummies upside down, a perplexed look on her face. Near the end of the brief video, the camera zooms in on the model’s identification badge to show she’s a doctor of osteopathy (DO).

My latest for the AMA. The whole shebang.

Flu vaccination: 6 tips to win over the undecideds

With each day seeing tens of thousands of new coronavirus cases in the U.S., the impending flu season is raising fears of a “twindemic” of COVID-19 and influenza that could sicken tens of millions of Americans and further strain the nation’s health system resources.

This raises anew the critical role that physicians play in doing whatever they can to ensure that all patients 6 months and older get the influenza vaccine. One key area for focus this year are the patients who haven’t made up their minds about whether to get the flu shot.

My lede. The whole shebang.

Federal legislation’s message to doctors: It’s OK to ask for help

Bipartisan congressional legislation named after a New York City emergency physician who died of suicide during the COVID-19 pandemic will help bolster the mental health infrastructure needed to support doctors and other health professionals who have worked tirelessly to save lives from the deadly respiratory illness caused by SARS-CoV-2.

My latest for the AMA, along with this story on a $20 billion round of CARES Act physician relief.