New BRCA recommendations: What primary care doctors must know

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has updated its recommendations on screening for the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic mutations that account for 15% of ovarian cancer cases and between 5% and 10% of breast cancer cases. Here is what primary care physicians should know about the new recommendations.

The USPSTF’s recommendation statement, published in JAMA along with the task force’s evidence report, represents a significant change to the group’s 2013 recommendations and broadens the pool of women for whom primary care physicians should conduct a risk assessment and potentially refer for genetic counseling and testing.

My latest for the AMA. The whole shebang.

Proposal would roll back LGBTQ protections. That’s an awful idea.

What’s the news: The AMA is strongly criticizing a proposed Department of Health and Human Services rule that would do away with Affordable Care Act (ACA) protections for LGBTQ people, women, immigrants, minorities and other patients.

“This proposal marks the rare occasion in which a federal agency seeks to remove civil rights protections,” AMA Executive Vice President and CEO James L. Madara, MD, wrote in a sharply worded letter to HHS Secretary Alex Azar. “It legitimizes unequal treatment of patients by not only providers, health care organizations, and insurers, but also by the government itself—and it will harm patients. Such policy should not be permitted by the U.S. government, let alone proposed by it.”

My latest for the AMA. The whole shebang.